Hands Up For Democracy in Burma

Another major article in a national newspaper – this time it’s the The Observer newspaper in the UK that ran a double page feature on this work with political prisoners. Thanks to Jack Davies for his time and the many long distance phone conversations we’ve had over the past week.

You can read the article on The Observer website.

Unlike the first major international feature article about this work in The Independent (which concentrated on telling the story about the work itself and about political prisoners) this article leads with the portraits of celebrities and politicians/statesmen accompanying the portraits of two former political prisoners – my friends ‘Zulu’ and ‘Andrew’ as it has now become a campaign and politics is on the agenda with the election fast approaching. This shows how with Amnesty International‘s involvement we have been able to attract high profile people to stand in solidarity on this issue. Raising awareness amongst the general public is crucial if we are to achieve our hopes of change. However, an unfortunate by-product of that need to educate and inform people is often the way in which the message is carried to the masses and in this article the rather unfortunate sub-heading stating that “Amnesty organised a unique photo project” may be true to the extent that a few celebrities have been photographed by Amnesty as well as more than 5,000 members of the public, but it does not reflect or respect the fact that this is an independent long term documentary project (still ongoing) in which many people in Burma as well as outside have put their lives on the line and continue to do so right now as we speak in order to get the world to stand up and take notice about the illegal incarceration of more than 2,150 political prisoners in Burma. To read about the actual “unique photo project” please read the Independent’s take on this matter. Amnesty International have of course done more than just arrange a few people to be photographed and they didn’t write the sub-heading that is misleading at best but unfortunate journalistic licence in order to attract attention like the large portrait that adorns both pages. Without Amnesty International being involved now in the capacity that they are there would be no major campaign, there would be no 5,000plus images of support being delivered by British Deputy Prime Minister to the ASEM meeting today and there would be no images of Nick Clegg himself and other world leaders, statesmen and celebrities standing in solidarity with the former political prisoners who are leading the way. Like the newspaper editor who said during the Saffron Revolution that Burma is only on the front pages because the colourful images of monks robes make good pictures, too often to get the world to listen you have to sanitize the truth. If a celebrity or even you or I can bring change to Burma and bring about the release of all political prisoners then I will be the first person to celebrate, but please don’t forget who it’s all about. Those who have suffered and those who continue to do so. They are the ones who are leading the way.

Copyright © ENIGMA IMAGES and not to be reproduced without permission.
All Rights Reserved

Tutu Raises A Hand For Suu Kyi

With the Arch’s portrait now officially released, DVB write up an article which will hopefully help spread the message not just further around the world but further inside Burma as well.

Full article here on the DVB website

Copyright © ENIGMA IMAGES and not to be reproduced without permission.
All Rights Reserved

Archbishop Tutu Demands The Release of Burma’s Political Prisoners

A massive moment for this campaign and it has been possible thanks to the Elders, an independent group of world leaders of which Archbishop Desmond  Tutu is the chair.
(Very special thanks to Katy Cronin and everyone at The Elders for their belief in this work and Burma’s political prisoners)

Full details can be read here on The Elders website

Archbishop Desmond Tutu demnads the release of Aung San Suu Kyi
and ALL of Burma’s political prisoners

“For me, Honorary Elder, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi is the living symbol of the Burmese people’s hope and courage. She is the embodiment of their determination to live in freedom, health and prosperity. That is why I have written her name on my hand.

“There are thousands of others who are also imprisoned and detained in Burma. Each of them is a sign of great hope, determination and courage. Please join Amnesty, the Elders and our fellow activists by naming each of Burma’s political prisoners, by holding that person’s name up and demanding their release.

“We condemn the ongoing detention of political prisoners. We call on Burma’s neighbours to make it clear to the military authorities that they must be released and that the people must be able to exercise their freedoms safely in the run-up to the elections on November 7.

“At every Elders meeting we always keep an empty chair for Daw Suu Kyi but she has never been able to join us. Work with us in the spirit shown by Burma’s activists, for the day when she and her fellow activists will be free.”

Copyright © ENIGMA IMAGES & The Elders and not to be reproduced without permission.
All Rights Reserved